Finding Warm Homes for Cold Noses Since 1991!

Golden Retriever Rescue of Atlanta

VOM

VOM

Freddie loves to be with his humans or his canine family members. He is always in a room with someone or laying next to one of my dogs. He loves his toys. My house looks like I have toddlers with all the toys all over the floor. His favorites are kong tennis balls that he just holds in his mouth and squeaks and a giant stuffed caterpillar. My dogs won't play (that's just them, nothing against Freddie) so he will bring a toy and put it on my lap, letting me know that he wants to play. He does get the zoomies so a big backyard is great. On rainy days, he zooms up and down my carpeted stairs. One of his favorite backyard activities is to hunt and chase lizards. Luckily the lizards are sly enough that he's never caught one. He gets very bouncy and excited when you first come home. Once you get him a bit settled, he will flop down on the ground and rollover for a belly rub. But my favorite thing about Freddie is how loving he is. He will come up and lay his head on my lap. He loves to be scratched under his chin. In the morning, when my husband's alarm goes off, Freddie goes over to him, puts his front paws on the edge of the bed and drapes half his body over my husband, looking for some morning cuddles. Freddie has adjusted pretty well. There are still some things we are working on. The first week was very trying for me. I wasn't sure I could keep Freddie. Freddie was highly reactive toward other dogs and aggressive when we had friends come over. But with the help of GRRA trainers, I realized that Freddie has just been through a lot and he needed to feel safe and loved, and he needed someone to show him how he should behave. Freddie reminded me that some dogs need a little extra patience, perseverance, and problem solving. Here's an example. Yesterday, Freddie saw a couple of new things in my home that made him very reactive (barking and lunging). One was a Roomba type vacuum and the other was a stationary bike. Both of these have been in my home since he came, but he's never seen them on. So now over the next few weeks, I will need to work with him by putting the leash on that I use of training, turn these items on, and desensitize him. I will show him how I expect him to behave around these things by using the "watch me" command and rewarding him with treats when he is calm. I think the heightened stress from these new things carried over into his walk this morning. He was more reactive than normal (barking and lunging) to other dogs. This behavior on walks was a huge problem when he first came to me but we have worked through it and usually walks in my neighborhood are very peaceful and relaxing. Now, walking on a path or a trail is a different story. Through trial and error/ problem solving, I have found the best way to walk him on a high traffic path is to have a gentle leader on him and a doggie backpack that's weighted just a bit. The backpack seems to settle him and the gentle leader helps me control him if he gets reactive. I know this is way more information than you need but I wanted to show how his new owner will need to be willing to work with him to help him reach his potential. He is very loving and loyal and needs someone who will bond with him and help him be the best version of Freddie. Freddie is completely housebroken. And, although he has a history of separation anxiety and destruction, I have not experienced any of that. But he does have 2 mature, well behaved dogs home with him and I'm not typically gone for very long at a time (4 to 5 hours max). I also gate off part of the house and keep the dogs in the kitchen/living room area. Freddie jumped my fence several times when he first came, but again, I've worked with him and haven't had any issues for the last several weeks. Here's what I'm looking for in his new home.

*Freddie needs exercise - a big backyard to run and a couple of long walks each day. *He needs discipline and structure - show him how you expect him to behave. He is very smart and will respond. *He needs love and affection - but make sure he’s settled first otherwise he gets too excited and jumps. *Ideally, Freddie would be in a home with another playful dog or at least another slightly older dog that serves as a good role model for him. If no other dogs, he needs someone who has a flexible schedule and can work from home part of the day. *Due to his high energy, older kids would be best (or no kids). I feel like Freddie is one of those dogs that will love and challenge you, but in the end you will have a strong bond where you will learn to read him and he will learn to read you, and just eye contact or a slight tug of the leash sends a message that Freddie understands. But you have to invest in building that bond. Luckily, I've already worked through and problem solved some of his more challenging behaviors and I can pass on everything I've learned!

Sincerely,

Tina , his foster mom

P.S. In one of the photos, you will notice Freddie's unique markings with a stripe of black around his middle. The shelter he came from researched and said Freddie has a somatic skin cell mutation which causes the unique coloring.

VOM

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